Monday, June 20, 2011

[kl-bogel] Tasmanian vacation Richmond and Tasman Peninsula

Of all the countless Australian Richmond this - probably the most notable. I wanted to go there since the day when I first saw the postcard depicting a pastoral village at Hobart. A postcard looked like this:



In this classic photo depicted just two interesting objects: the oldest bridge in Australia and is the oldest operating Catholic church. The bridge was built between 1823 and 1825 - of course, by the convicts who were brought back chunks of local sandstone with hand carts.



Under the bridge flows the river Coal (Coal River). Contrary to the name - and in contrast to the rivers on the continent - the water in her blue and clean.



A very pleasant place to stroll and picnic. It is a pity that we had little time: We arrived just in the evening. On the river bank here is such a wonderful, typical house in the Tasmanian georgianskom style. Pay attention to the covered walkway: it is a specific local feature, like verandas.



In the town a lot of interesting: the oldest Australian jail (you will notice that in Tasmania is full of very old?), A maze, art galleries and crafts, as well as a miniature model of old Hobart. Picturesque Richmond, once served as a stopover on the way to the Tasman Peninsula, preserved almost intact, and on its streets just nice to walk. We sat in a cute little tea (a 19th century building is occupied shop), for which there was a real rustic bathroom under a tree. On it, instead of the delicate "lady-gentlemen" or international piktogrammok, was derived simply "Loo"%)

After leaving the cafe just before sunset, we strolled toward the very same Catholic Church that at the first photo. It dates from the year 1837, and it still performed the service.



From inside the church is very modest, even though Catholic. This is understandable: the young colony was not up to luxury.



Behind the church is an old Catholic cemetery. It climbs the hill above the river, and there on the hillside, towering stone Celtic crosses. The feeling is like suddenly found himself in Britain.



Now let's go south to the Tasman Peninsula. In addition to the prison in Port Arthur , he is known for its natural beauty. Within a large national park laid out a few tourist tracks of varying difficulty. We planned to walk on them, but eventually sacrificed for the sake of bushvokingom art and limited to those places which are easily accessible by car.



One of the natural wonders that can be seen on a narrow isthmus between the peninsula and in fact, Tasmania - a "mosaic pavement» (Tessellated pavement). All the rocky shore seemed to be lined with a ruler or laid out neatly hewn boards.



This curious "bridge" - the result of erosion of longitudinal cracks, and they, in turn, arose under shear deformations. Sea salt and abrasive sand, penetrating into the cracks, slowly doing their job, and we can only marvel at what a ingenious nature.



Among the other attractions of the peninsula - the Tasman Arch (Tasman's Arch):



... And the Devil's Kitchen (Devils Kitchen).



These unusual geological formations were once just the caves, but over time they have fallen off a "ceiling". Looks impressive. I'm in such cases, immediately start thinking about those European explorers who first came upon these beauties. At that time there were no marked trails carefully, no protective barerchikov before the abyss ... Brrr%)

And we, meanwhile, flew back to Tasmania at the weekend and brought back a lot of unforgettable impressions and images. So, apparently, the theme of the smallest Australian state in my log is not closed, and will not be closed for a long time. Very much interesting there:)

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