Saturday, August 20, 2011

[Mcm2Ada] Iklan di benua Arab (88 photos)

Any advertising in the Arab countries, including the logo, should be forcibly adapted to local cultural values ​​and the Arabic language. And for this you need to know that symbolize various animals and how to represent characters can be interpreted in certain subjects in Islamic countries.


For example, dogs are considered "unclean animals", so you rarely see where the puppies in the ad. There are other features, such as fish symbolizes Christianity, the crow - the death, and a chameleon - hypocrisy.

Any manifestations of supernatural forces (witches, wizards, vampires, aliens) can be interpreted as equating to God, so forbidden to display. In addition, caution should be used, the words "create" and "greatest" because they are also associated with God.

Drugs, alcohol, or simply an empty glass of champagne can not be portrayed in advertising. Exclusion - social advertising. Also under the strictest ban homosexuality and any hints of sexual orientation.
The Crusades left a deep wound in the Arab psychology, so any form of crosses are considered as violations. Therefore, there is no organization, "Red Cross" - it is called "Red Crescent". Even the snowflake may be ill intent, because you can get some crosses in it. Should not be used as visual symbols of the Star of David or a five-pointed red star, including the U.S. flag. It should be borne in mind that the signs indicate the opposite direction, as in Arab countries read from right to left.

Red "Cross"


In the most conservative countries in Asia banned in advertising to show open eyes. Thus advertising agencies have to show imagination, showing people. The most popular solution to the problem:
Pixelation
Wear glasses
Roll his eyes with pleasure





Lays Ad
Sexuality

Words such as "enjoy" or "exciting" may be understood as a description of sexual motives, so they are avoided.

Nudity is prohibited in any form. Islamic culture is very conservative, so the skin can show only the face, hands and feet. Some countries, such as the UAE is more liberal.

Agency Ogilvy Jeddah (Saudi Arabia) presented a printed campaign for lingerie Change Lingerie. In Saudi Arabia, allowed to show nudity in advertising, creative concept and plays it. Slogan: Everything except the underwear.





In order to protect its citizens from the corrupt West, the censors have to resort to an incredible effort. Photoshop comes to the rescue, and handy tools - a black marker, paper and glue. Considering that even innocuous cleavage makes a woman naked is not permissible, the work of employees in the state machine to spare.



Gisele Bundchen at the advertising pictures of clothes H & M in Dubai "acquired" a modest white shirts.



Logs are hand-censorship, "finalized" even covers.



Particular attention is paid to advertising of films, it has to be retouched in order to comply with strict cultural expectations. Legs, chest and shoulders even have to be closed. This applies not only to women but to men. Even cartoon characters should be dressed.

Scooby-Doo (It - So).



Arab censors often becomes an occasion for jokes in the outdoor advertising and advertising brands. Dissatisfaction with stringent requirements for advertising in the Arab world, expressed the visitors the London Underground by filling shield Dolce & Gabbana, and brand Wonderbra.



Brands

Producing adaptation of brands to the Asian market, companies are faced with the requirement to write his name in Arabic script. At the same time, trying to keep at least some hint of the world-famous trademark.



Do we know many brands whose names are written in the original lettering? How to maintain corporate identity, turning the word mirror? Most often it is not possible. And the relationship between the original and localization can only conditionally - with corporate colors, the height of letters.

This material - photographs taken by Western blogger has been in the New Year holidays in the United Arab Emirates and to visit several shopping malls in Dubai.
Most of the adaptation - the literal transliteration of the Latin alphabet to Arabic script.

By law, most Arab countries, Arabic name should go first. And we used to see first name in English. In this case, are satisfied by both parties. And the west, which reads from left to right, and east, which reads from right to left. For all of us "right" sign comes first.

FedEx Kinko's
In the case of FedEx'om Arab designers even managed to keep the famous arrow hidden in the logo. While the new version of the hand is not so hidden - smooth Arabic fonts are not designed for such angular lines and things, so the letter had to break, but for the sake of the arrow is not such a big sacrifice.



Calvin Klein
In the case of some brands, the designers did not try to make a similar font with the font of the original, typography sacrificing for the sake of the spirit of the brand. For example, Rolex, Calvin Klein and Lacoste. All three brands are using the simplest classic fonts to emphasize their dignity, simplicity and adherence to traditions. Arabic fonts used in local variants, correspond exactly to the same requirements - a classic of Arabic typography.



Lacoste



Rolex



YvesSaintLaurent



Banana Republic



Benetton



Bose



Burberry



Bvlgari



Coach





Dean & Deluca



Foot Locker



Gucci



Tommy Hilfiger



Jimmy Choo



Kenneth Cole




Louis Vuitton





Moschino



Waitrose



The Body Shop



Fono



MAC





Olympus



Pearle Opticians



Sephora



Starbucks



Subway





Taco Bell



TGI Friday's



Baskin Robbins



Burger King



Chili's



The Coffee Bean



Dunkin Donuts



Hardee's





KFC



McDonald's



Papa John's





Pizza Hut



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